Progress on Medicaid Reform

 

It is widely understood that the rapid increase in spending for entitlements (Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid) is the main driver of our debt problem.  Anything that can be done to get spending for these programs under control is of great value.
The problem with Medicaid is that a fixed percentage of each state’s costs is paid for by the federal government.  The more a state spends, the more that is contributed by the federal government which is a disincentive for states to control their own spending.  From 1989 to 2013, the share of state budgets devoted to Medicaid rose from 9% to 19%.  This upward trend is a problem for both state and federal government and is clearly unsustainable.
One way to change the spending incentive is to turn Medicaid into a block-grant program whereby the federal government contributes a specific amount of money to each state each year and gives states more leeway in designing their own programs.  States would then have a much bigger incentive to hold down costs and the flexibility to be able to do it.
CaptureProgress is being made in this direction with the use of waivers:

  • Rhode Island received a waiver in 2009 to try out various cost-saving measures such as wellness programs, co-payments, etc. It has been quite successful and very well received.
  • Last year Pennsylvania agreed to expand Medicaid to an additional 500,000 people along with a waiver allowing people above the poverty line to be charged premiums of up to 2% of their household income as well as being charged an $8 copayment for use of emergency rooms.
  • Now Indiana (http://www.wsj.com/articles/indiana-governor-to-expand-medicaid-coverage-1422371729) has agreed to an expansion with a waiver under which beneficiaries above the poverty level would be charged premiums of 2% of income and would be locked out of benefits for six months if they fall behind in their payments.
  • Additional states such as Idaho, Wyoming, Utah, Tennessee, Alabama and Florida are also considering Medicaid expansions and likely will be influenced by the possibility of receiving similar waivers.

Waivers are not as cost effective as block-grant funding but they are an improvement over the existing one-size-fits-all federal rules.  If more individual states are able to show that waivers really do work to reduce costs, this will increase the likelihood of implementing a block-grant system.

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